November 2017 Sworkit App

Sworkit

What it is: Sworkit is a fitness app that provides stretching, cardio and yoga workouts on demandsworkit-update.png

What devices: Iphone, Ipads and Android devices

Cost: Free or for a fee a premium version that is ad-free and has access to a broader range of exercise plans

Who should use it: Patients, caretakers and physicians, pretty much anyone and everyone

Why use it:  Sworkit limits excuses.  This the best most portable exercise program around.  Every exercise program in the Sworkit app requires no equipment.  All you need for good work out is your phone and a little space.  If you have 5 minutes at the office, you can use Sworkit.  If you have 15 minutes in your hotel room while traveling, you can use Sworkit.  Sworkit eliminates the barriers you have to the cardiovascular exercise we need for optimal health.

When you download the Sworkit app, you have access to a guided set of exercises.  Sworkit will take you through set of exercises based on your preferences for yoga, strength training, cardio or stretching.  The programs can last as long as 60 minutes or can be done in as little as 5 minutes.  Each exercise movement can be seen on your device screen as a video which shows you exactly what to do.  There is a voice overlay prompt and a timer to tell you when to move on to the next movement.  The benefit of being able to tap an app and then have a guided exercise program is unparalleled.

The Premium features are included for $7.99 monthly fee or $59.99 for the year and include access to several extra exercise routines and the ability to use guided workout plans or customize workouts the way you want.  The Premium version is ad-free but the ads in the Free version are not that distracting at all.

Download Sworkit today and you can have a digital personal trainer lead you in a great exercise routine anytime and anywhere you and your phone can go.

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Connected Health Conference Day 2

       The second and final day of the Connected Health Conference was another great and engaging way to spend a day indulging in digital health technology.  Several themes continued to emerge as the conference wound down.
Personalization
       Many Digital Health companies are trying to provide personalized experiences for their customers.  Using video, text and even digital personal assistants like Alexa, these companies are looking to make something unique for each patient.  Patients may change behaviors and make more lasting changes with personalized experiences and regular communications.  A lot of the options included regular coaching and taking a more holistic look at a disease process.  I found it quite fascinating that results one company was able to obtain with weight loss when they incorporated virtual mental health care.
AI
       Whether its called Artificial Intelligence, Augmented Intelligence or Assisted PilloIntelligence, it is clear that AI is going to become a large part of the healthcare landscape very soon.  As above, some of the personalization of digital health technology can be algorithmic to guide diagnosis and treatment options.  AI can predict a diagnosis based on symptoms as well and physicians in many cases and are even better at identifying skin cancers.  Fairly soon, a patient may be able to use AI to help understand the symptoms they have, maybe even diagnose themselves and then guide a patient through the next step in the healthcare system.  The picture to the right is of Pillo, a new AI driven droid like robot that will dispense your medications on time, discuss your health, call you family and even activate emergency services if needed.
       For physicians, we will have to start to adapt to having AI as part of our work flow.  Initially it might just be technology with natural language processing allowing physicians an easier way to interact with EMRs.  But as AI proves to be more any more effective at synthesizing and analyzing data, physicians may find that they no longer need to spend much time on the process of diagnosis.  As above, if a patient can check a worrisome more at home with an app on their phone, the physician may just be needed to confirm and remove the lesion.  Physicians may find that they are spending much more time creating treatment plans and executing a treatment plan than looking for a specific disease.
Convenience
       A fascinating statistic was discussed at the Connected Health Conference that has been churning around my brain.  The average American has 4 physician visits a year and spends about 15 minutes of face time with a physician each time.  That adds up to just one hour of face to face time with a physician every year for the average American.  When you think about it from a patient point of view, there is so much that is inconvenient about medical care.  Most outpatient care follows business hours, so an appointment requires taking time away from work.
       It is almost a cliche to talk about wait times but once a patient takes time off from work, spends time driving to their physician’s office, they will need to wait for 15-60 minutes in the waiting room.  Then once they are actually taken to an exam room they usually wait there, allowing the physician to determine the beginning and end of every appointment, simply by walking in and out of the exam room.  There are insurance hassles and paperwork hassles and call-back issues.  Trying to see a physician is inconvenient for a lot of people.  Digital health is trying to change that, providing technology that can bring the healthcare system to the patient on their terms.  I heard many times at the conference that a patient’s home is going to become the center of their healthcare delivery.  Withe remote patient monitoring, home diagnostics, AI driven personal healthcoaches and virtual visits, digital health can provide convenient care that a patient is more likely to use and use in an effective manner.
       Overall, I felt the Connected Health Conference was a huge success and I had a profound impact on me.  By empowering patients to be at the lead of their own care Digital Health will revolutionize where and how we provide and receive medical care – and sooner than we think.